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Pekka Rinne, Predators bounce back, beat Penguins in Game 3 of Stanley Cup Final
NASHVILLE, Tenn. — Predators coach Peter Laviolette heard all the questions and criticism of his Pekka Rinne after the goaltender’s struggles in the Stanley Cup Final in Pittsburgh. Well, Laviolette never thought of switching goalies. A change of scenery helped Rinne and all his Nashville teammates as they dominated once again on their own ice for the biggest piece of franchise history yet. A victory in the Stanley Cup Final. Related ArticlesJune 3, 2017 Nashville helps Predators’ celebrate history with 1st Stanley Cup Final June 2, 2017 P.K. Subban promises Predators will win Game 3 on home ice vs. Penguins June 1, 2017 Jake Guentzel climbing record book for Pittsburgh Penguins May 31, 2017 Penguins take 2-0 Stanley Cup lead with win vs. Predators May 31, 2017 Prosecutors to drop charges in Stanley Cup dead catfish toss Roman Josi and Frederick Gaudreau scored 42 seconds apart in the second period, and the Predators beat the Pittsburgh Penguins 5-1 Saturday night to pull within 2-1 in the best-of-seven series. Rinne started and made 27 saves against a Pittsburgh team that continued to struggle on the power play and lacked the same zip they had in winning the first two games at home. “There was no decision,” Laviolette said of changing goalies. “He was terrific. I said that after Game 2. He’s been the backbone for our team. He’s been excellent. His game tonight was rock solid.” The Predators capped the biggest party in Nashville history with a victory that gave thousands of fans inside and outside of the arena reason to celebrate. Country star Keith Urban and wife, actress Nicole Kidman, were high-fiving inside the arena and they had plenty of company. Credit Rinne for coming through with a stingy performance and helping the Predators improve to 8-1 at home this postseason. The 6-foot-5 Finn looked so shaky in the first two games, giving up eight goals on just 36 shots. Laviolette benched him in the third period of Game 2 when Rinne gave up three goals in the first 3:28 of a 4-1 loss. Rinne said he changed nothing and knew he was playing all the time. Nashville fans did their best to lift his spirits by chanting his name in pre-game warm-ups. “Collectively we came into the locker room, and we were telling each other we’ve never seen anything like that,” Rinne said. BOX SCORE: Predators 5, Penguins 1 Josi also had two assists. James Neal, Craig Smith and Mattias Ekholm also scored for Nashville as the Predators worked out some frustration against the Pens. “Like our team has done the whole playoffs against Chicago, St. Louis, Anaheim, we showed really good composure,” said Nashville defenseman P.K. Subban, who had predicted a win in Game 3. “We’re going to take that into the next game.” Game 4 is Monday night. Pittsburgh coach Mike Sullivan said he thought his Penguins gave up a couple of easy goals. “We’re disappointed we didn’t get the result, but we also understand that this is a series,” Sullivan said. “Our guys, they’ve been through this. They can draw on their experience. We’re not going to let this certainly get us down. We’re going to learn from it, move by it and get ready for the next game.” Captain Sidney Crosby did not have a shot on goal, and neither did Evgeni Malkin. “Hopefully a game like this is something that’s a hard lesson,” Crosby said. “But we’ve got to make sure we’re better.” Jake Guentzel scored his 13th goal this postseason and fourth of this series for Pittsburgh and now is one off Dino Ciccarelli’s rookie record of 14 in 1981 for Minnesota. Guentzel, already with two game-winning goals in the series, put the Penguins up 1-0 on their second shot with a wrister off a rebound of Ian Cole that beat Rinne just 2:46 into the game. Rinne stopped the next 26 shots for the victory and the party continued into the night. Early on, Matt Murray extended his scoreless streak to 72:54 with the Pittsburgh goalie looking ready to notch his 21st playoff win. Then he gave up five goals in the span of 15 shots and the catfish watch was on. The Predators got it started with a three-goal flurry in the second. Josi scored his sixth goal off a slap shot at 5:51, tying it at 1-1 and finally giving nervous fans something to enjoy. Then Gaudreau, who scored his first career NHL goal in Game 1, scored 42 seconds later to put Nashville ahead with his wrister from the high slot, taking advantage of a screen by Penguins defenseman Ian Cole to beat Murray glove-side. Just after that go-ahead goal, the Penguins had a rush on Rinne, and the three-time Vezina Trophy finalist made back-to-back big saves. First, he stopped Phil Kessel’s wrister from the right circle. The rebound bounced bac [...]
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LoDo: A renaissance owed to Coors Field, urban pioneers and smart politics
More than a decade before the gates of Coors Field first opened to enthusiastic Rockies fans, the dark and dormant blocks of Denver’s old warehouse district already were preparing, slowly, for a rebirth. In the 1980s, artists, gallery owners, graphic designers and startup entrepreneurs who were among Lower Downtown’s urban pioneers pried the boards off warehouse windows and doors. Long-surviving establishments, from El Chapultepec jazz club on 20th Street to the Wazee Supper Club on 15th — beneath a rickety overhead viaduct — gave the place a blinkering pulse. That persistence dovetailed with a years-long preservation fight, risks taken by developers and forward-looking — sometimes controversial — decisions made by city leaders, including a young new mayor who had taken an interest in revitalizing that part of downtown. By 1995, when Coors Field debuted as the permanent home of Colorado’s Major League Baseball expansion team in its third year, LoDo was primed for a resurgence that would bring exponential growth in population and property values. The stadium provided the final spark. “In many ways, I think (Coors Field’s) impact on Lower Downtown has exceeded a lot of people’s expectations” — especially in its residential growth, said former Mayor Federico Peña, who took office in 1983 at age 36. He quickly elevated long-simmering efforts to attract a baseball team and, later, lobbied for the LoDo stadium site. Neighborhood lore portrays future mayor and governor John Hickenlooper and his fellow investors as pioneers for opening Wynkoop Brewing Co., the city’s first craft brewery, at 18th and Wynkoop streets in 1988. And they were. But eight years earlier, Joanne and Manny Salzman bought the four-story building next door on the cheap. The couple moved from their house on a quiet street off Colorado Boulevard after their youngest son went to college. They renovated the top floor as their home and rented out commercial spaces on the floors below. They became among LoDo’s first loft-dwellers. “We moved here because we were looking for a community that could protect and encourage artistic endeavors in a city that, at that time, didn’t have a community as strong as we thought it could,” recalled Joanne Salzman. She later would spend nearly two decades helping to maintain LoDo’s historic character on a design review board, but she recognizes that baseball changed the onetime arts enclave’s feel, for better or worse. The Rockies’ move to LoDo from their temporary home at Mile High Stadium — and the opening four years later of the Pepsi Center, across Speer Boulevard, for Denver’s professional basketball and hockey teams — did something important, neighborhood leaders and former city officials say: The sports venues brought throngs of people to a little-visited part of downtown that many suburbanites had perceived to be empty and unsafe. LoDo’s trickle of new loft-dwellers became a flood. Technology startups came to LoDo in droves, the bar and dance club scene took off, and new shops and restaurants opened. Look at LoDo now LoDo’s success has been stark and has spilled far beyond the compact boundaries of the official historic district, perhaps contributing to an exaggerated perception of its size. But the population growth even within its confines — generally from Wynkoop southeast to Market Street and Speer Boulevard northeast to 20th Street — is telling. A population of no more than 200 in the late 1980s ballooned to 2,410 by 2015, according to the Downtown Denver Partnership. Add the large-scale new apartment and condo buildings to the northeast that coalesced into the Ballpark neighborhood, and the rise-from-the-dirt Central Platte Valley between Union Station and the South Platte River, and that number approaches 12,000, the partnership says. Another measure of Coors Field’s impact: The value of all property in LoDo and near the stadium has grown three times faster since it opened than has the value of property in all of Denver, according to the city assessor’s records. In 1994, the aggregate land value estimated by the assessor’s office for the area stretching from roughly Larimer Square to Park Avenue and Wazee was $305 million. As of last June, it had risen to nearly $3.8 billion — an elevenfold increase in raw dollars, or a sixfold surge after accounting for inflation. That excludes the stadium itself, which cost $215 million to build. About three-quarters of the construction cost was provided by metro-area taxpayers, with project bonds repaid years ago using a voter-approved 0.1 percent sales tax for the Denver Metropolitan Major League [...]
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Prosecutors to drop charges in Stanley Cup dead catfish toss
PITTSBURGH — Prosecutors are dropping charges filed against a Tennessee man for throwing a catfish onto the rink in Pittsburgh during the opening of the Stanley Cup Final. Jacob Waddell, 36, was charged in Allegheny County with disorderly conduct, possessing instruments of crime and disrupting meetings or processions after tossing the dead fish over the glass surrounding the rink Monday night during the Nashville Predators–Pittsburgh Penguins game. District Attorney Stephen Zappala said in a Facebook post Wednesday that Waddell’s actions “do not rise to the level of criminal charges” so the charges “will be withdrawn in a timely manner.” Nashville Mayor Megan Barry had called for the charges to be “quickly dismissed.” Related ArticlesJune 2, 2017 P.K. Subban promises Predators will win Game 3 on home ice vs. Penguins June 1, 2017 Jake Guentzel climbing record book for Pittsburgh Penguins May 31, 2017 Penguins take 2-0 Stanley Cup lead with win vs. Predators May 30, 2017 Penguins wary, Predators confident as Game 2 looms May 28, 2017 Mystique vs. mayhem in unlikely Stanley Cup Final Waddell called himself “a dumb redneck with a bad idea” in a conversation with Nashville radio station WGFX-FM . He said he bought an “entirely too big” catfish in Tennessee, fileted it and cut half the spine out, and then ran over it with his pickup truck several times to make it easier to pack. “I tried putting it in my boot, but … the head was too damn big,” he said. “No matter how much I ran over it with the truck, the head was too damn big.” He said he sprayed the fish with cologne and body spray, packed it in a cooler, and sneaked it into the arena by stuffing it down his pants between two layers of regular and compression underwear — having tested the method by wearing the fish at his in-law’s home for 20 minutes without them suspecting anything. He took his $350 upper-level seat before descending to the lower level to accomplish the stunt. Gene J. Puskar, The Associated PressAn ice worker removes a fish during the second period of Game 1 of the NHL hockey Stanley Cup Finals between the Pittsburgh Penguins and Nashville Predators on Monday, May 29, 2017, at PPG Paints Arena in Pittsburgh. “It was absolutely — 10 times over — worth it,” he told the station. “I would do it a thousand more times, absolutely.” [...]
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Jake Guentzel climbing record book for Pittsburgh Penguins
PITTSBURGH — The fresh-faced, 22-year-old rookie who leads the NHL in playoff goals — a hot streak that has him in the middle of the Conn Smythe Trophy conversation given to the postseason MVP — was once too embarrassed to shoot the puck. So Jake Guentzel didn’t. Not in any sort of great quantity. Better to use his uncanny vision to set up teammates than be greedy. It’s a mindset that helped the budding Pittsburgh Penguins star set a school record for assists during his freshman year at Nebraska-Omaha three years ago, a selflessness coach Dean Blais tried to change, with mixed results. “You want to be unselfish,” Blais said told Guentzel over and over during Guentzel’s three years with the Mavericks. “But when you’ve got the opportunity to bury it, you bury it.” Consider the message finally received. Related ArticlesJune 2, 2017 P.K. Subban promises Predators will win Game 3 on home ice vs. Penguins May 31, 2017 Prosecutors to drop charges in Stanley Cup dead catfish toss May 30, 2017 Penguins wary, Predators confident as Game 2 looms May 29, 2017 Jake Guentzel’s goal lifts Penguins over Predators in Game 1 of Stanley Cup Final May 29, 2017 NHL’s international plan includes China but not Olympics Guentzel beat Nashville’s Pekka Rinne twice in Pittsburgh’s 4-1 win in Game 2 of the Stanley Cup Final on Wednesday as the Penguins took a 2-0 lead in the best-of-seven series. The Nebraska-born, Minnesota-raised son of a coach who spent most of his childhood trying to keep up with older brothers Ryan and Gabe now has a dozen goals during the postseason. That’s the most ever by an American-born rookie and within two of Dino Ciccarelli’s NHL rookie record set while playing for the Minnesota North Stars in 1981. Oh, and his five game-winning goals so far are tops among first-year players in a league that dates back a century. “Someone that would have dreamed this is lying,” Blais said with a laugh. Maybe, but this is hardly a fluke. Painting the beginning of Guentzel’s NHL career as charmed — he did happen to score on his first two shots in his NHL debut in a loss against the New York Rangers in November — doesn’t do justice to his talent and work ethic. Sure, there’s a little puck luck involved, but not much. You don’t pour in 28 goals and 24 assists in 61 games thanks to a bounce or two. “He’s been given a lot of responsibility and he’s done a great job of just continuing to improve and compete,” Penguins captain Sidney Crosby said. It’s not a coincidence Pittsburgh’s equipment manager Dana Heinze put Guentzel in a stall adjacent to Crosby’s when the rookie was called up for good in January. It’s a practice the team uses to give young players a chance to get acclimated to life in the NHL while sitting next to the face of the game. Putting a newbie next to Crosby also creates minimal distraction for the rest of the room during the daily media crush around the two-time Hart Trophy winner. Eventually, however, the crowd breaks up. It’s in those quiet moments that Crosby becomes equal parts mentor and teammate. “I think Sid has a really nice way of making those guys feel comfortable when they come into our dressing room,” Penguins coach Mike Sullivan said. “The influence he has on these kids goes a long way to giving these kids the confidence that they need.” Not that Guentzel has ever lacked confidence (his Twitter handle is the playful @jakenbake20 ), even if he doesn’t exactly fit the physical profile of an elite goal scorer at 5-feet-11 and 180 pounds. Yet he’s thrived anyway thanks to a preternatural sense of timing and a hockey IQ gleaned from a lifetime around the game. He was never the biggest in his family but found a way to keep up with Gabe (six years older) and Ryan (eight years older) anyway. “He got the puck taken away from his a lot,” Blais said. “So he learned how to move it. How to protect it. He was always one step ahead.” In some ways, he still is. Guentzel’s winner in Game 1 against Nashville is a testament to his vision and patience. He was at center ice when the puck was pinched along the wall. He began sprinting toward the Nashville zone before teammate Brian Dumoulin even had it. By the time Guentzel collected Matt Cullen’s one-touch pass, he was racing in on Rinne. Rather than just fling the puck at the goaltender, he pulled it back , allowing Nashville’s Ryan Ellis to inadvertently screen Rinne. The goaltender could only wave his glove at it as it ripped into the net to put Pittsburgh ahead to stay. The player who never wanted to shoot now can’t seem to stop. Blais can’t help but l [...]
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P.K. Subban promises Predators will win Game 3 on home ice vs. Penguins
NASHVILLE, Tenn. — A good night’s sleep has P.K. Subban more confident than ever about what the Nashville Predators will do on their own ice trailing the Pittsburgh Penguins 0-2 in the Stanley Cup Final. He delivered an All-Star guarantee for Saturday night. “There’s no question,” Subban said Thursday. “We’re going to win the next game, and then we’ll move forward.” Subban came very close to guaranteeing a win in the moments after Pittsburgh’s 4-1 win Wednesday night. The Penguins turned a 1-1 game into a rout by scoring three goals in the first 3:28 of the third period , forcing Nashville coach Peter Laviolette to pull star goaltender Pekka Rinne for rookie Juuse Saros. On Thursday, the All-Star defenseman channeled Mark Messier, who backed up his own guarantee of a Rangers’ win against New Jersey in the 1994 Eastern Conference finals. Subban explained why he was so confident, noting the Predators know they deserve to be playing for the Stanley Cup. “We’re capable of playing even better than we did in Pittsburgh, and I thought we played some great hockey,” Subban said. “I mean, out of 120 minutes, maybe we’d like to take back six of them. Ultimately, we have to be realistic with where we’re at. We’re down 2-nothing. We’re coming back in our barn, and we don’t lose here. So it starts Saturday.” Laviolette gave no hint about whether Rinne will start Game 3, saying only that he will not talk about lineup changes. The Predators coach says his goalies know who will start. Rinne went into the final with the stingiest numbers in net this postseason and a favorite to win the Conn Smythe trophy as postseason MVP. The 34-year-old goalie has instead given up eight goals on 36 shots through two games. Two goals went off teammates and into the net, but it has not been the inspiring performance that the Predators and their fans are used to from the big Finn. His save percentage has dipped throughout the playoffs — .976 against Chicago, then .932 against St. Louis and .925 in the West finals against Anaheim. Against the quick-strike Penguins, it’s just .778. Still, the three-time Vezina Trophy finalist has allowed only 13 goals in eight playoff games at home and his teammates vowed to play better defense. “It’s not his fault by any means,” Nashville captain Mike Fisher said of the goals allowed in Pittsburgh. “We know we can do a better job in front of him. It’s a team game, and everyone looks at shots and save percentage but forget about the quality and who we’re playing. And certain parts of the game where we got to help him out.” Defenseman Ryan Ellis, who has played with Rinne for six years, called the goalie Nashville’s best player, night in and night out. “There’s nothing that can replace Peks,” Ellis said. Returning home should provide a boost for both Rinne and the Predators. They are 7-1 inside Bridgestone Arena this postseason with the lone loss coming in overtime. They expect a loud arena for Game 3, which is the first Cup Final home game in Nashville history and it comes on a Saturday night. Related ArticlesJune 1, 2017 Jake Guentzel climbing record book for Pittsburgh Penguins May 31, 2017 Penguins take 2-0 Stanley Cup lead with win vs. Predators May 31, 2017 Prosecutors to drop charges in Stanley Cup dead catfish toss May 30, 2017 Penguins wary, Predators confident as Game 2 looms May 28, 2017 Mystique vs. mayhem in unlikely Stanley Cup Final “I’m sure they’ll hear the noise and the energy in the building,” Subban said of the Penguins. “It’s a fun atmosphere to play.” Nashville may be home, but the Penguins have history on their side. Since the Final went to the best-of-seven format in 1939, teams leading 2-0 have won 45 of 50 series. That includes the last three such situations with the Kings winning in 2012 and 2014 and the Penguins a year ago. Pittsburgh also is proof that a team can rally from an 0-2 deficit to win the Stanley Cup, doing it in 2009 to beat Detroit in seven games. Boston did the same thing against Vancouver in 2011, also a seven-game series. Coach Mike Sullivan said his Penguins are experienced enough to understand the need to focus. The Penguins lost 5-1 in Nashville last October, and the atmosphere will be much more intense this time around with a forecast that could include fan-tossed catfish. “I think we have to embrace the energy that’s going to be in the city and in the building,” Sullivan said. “We’ve just got to focus on those things that we can control, and that’s going to be our competitive level, our attitude, our execution, all of those things within our control. That’s [...]
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Penguins take 2-0 Stanley Cup lead with win vs. Predators
PITTSBURGH — The Pittsburgh Penguins kept Pekka Rinne plenty busy this time. Too busy for Rinne and the rest of the Nashville Predators to keep up with the surging defending Stanley Cup champions. Jake Guentzel, Scott Wilson and Evgeni Malkin scored 3:18 apart early in the third period as the Penguins chased Rinne and pulled away for a 4-1 victory in Game 2 of the Stanley Cup Final on Wednesday night. The Penguins lead the best-of-seven series 2-0. Game 3 is Saturday night in Nashville in what amounts to a last stand for the Predators and their suddenly very average-looking goalie. The 22-year-old Guentzel finished with two goals to give him an NHL-high 12 during the playoffs, the second-most by a rookie in postseason history. His 19 playoff points are the most by an American-born first-year player and he’ll have at least two more cracks at adding to that total. If the Predators don’t get it together back home in “Smashville,” it might only be two. “It’s crazy,” Guentzel said. “You can’t even put into words what it feels. But we know the ultimate goal is two more wins and they’re going to be tough to get.” Boxscore: Pittsburgh 4, Nashville 1 Matt Murray played spectacularly at times through the first two periods, buying his teammates enough time to find their footing and get to Rinne. Murray finished with 37 saves in all as he helped move the Penguins to within two victories of becoming the first team to go back-to-back since the Detroit Red Wings in 1998. Pontus Aberg scored the lone goal for the Predators, who were once again undone by a sudden barrage from the NHL’s highest-scoring team. In Game 1, the Penguins pushed three goals by Rinne in a span of 4:11 in the first period to build a 3-0 lead. The Predators rallied to tie before Guentzel’s go-ahead goal with 3:17 remaining put the Penguins ahead to stay. This time, Pittsburgh’s flurry came a little bit later. And it was once again led by the baby-faced son of a coach who has no problem shouldering the responsibility of playing alongside star Sidney Crosby. The game was tied at 1 at the start of the third period when Guentzel jumped on a rebound 10 seconds into the period to put Pittsburgh ahead. Wilson was credited with his third of the playoffs just over 3 minutes later when a centering pass caromed off Nashville’s Vernon Fiddler and by Rinne. Malkin added his ninth of the playoffs and second of the series just 15 seconds later and Rinne was skating to the bench in favor of backup Juuse Saros after stopping 21 of 25 shots. “When we score one, we don’t stop,” Malkin said. “We want to score more. The first shift in the third period, we score. We want more. It’s our game. Never stop.” Rinne fell to 0-5-0 in five career starts in Pittsburgh and he has never beaten the Penguins anywhere as a starter. “We’ve done good things,” Nashville coach Peter Laviolette said. “For 5½ periods, we like what we did. There’s a stretch they’re able to gain some momentum, able to capitalize and be opportunistic and that swung two games in their favor.” Pittsburgh vowed to put more pressure on Rinne than it managed in their 5-3 victory in Game 1, a win they managed despite going 37 minutes without throwing a single puck Rinne’s way and none in the second period, the first time that’s happened since the NHL started tracking shots in 1957. The Penguins matched their entire shot total from the opener (12) by the end of the first period but still found themselves trying to keep up with the Predators. The Stanley Cup newbies were disappointed but not dismayed by their Game 1 loss, pointing to the way they carried play for long stretches as tangible proof they weren’t just happy to be here. The result was the kind of up-and-down play that showcased the speed on both sides and included more than a dash of antagonism, particularly early. Nashville’s Matt Irwin drilled Pittsburgh’s Matt Cullen from behind into the boards in the first period, a hit that left the 40-year-old Cullen headed down the runway for a quick check but didn’t result in a penalty. Minutes later, Penguins forward Chris Kunitz became tangled up with P.K. Subban and ended up cross-checking Subban in the head, part of a sequence that saw Malkin go off for hooking. Malkin and Subban even ended up fighting in the third period when things got out of hand. It was a scene hard to imagine through the first two taut and chippy periods. Related ArticlesMay 31, 2017 Prosecutors to drop charges in Stanley Cup dead catfish toss May 30, 2017 Penguins wary, Predators confident as Game 2 looms May 28, 2017 Mystique vs. mayhem in unlikely Stanley Cup Final May 27, 2017 Minus Kris Letang, anonymous Pittsburgh Penguins’ defe [...]
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Penguins wary, Predators confident as Game 2 looms
By Will Graves, The Associated Press PITTSBURGH — The winning team went nearly two full periods without a shot. The hottest goaltender in the playoffs was only tested 11 times in 58 minutes — and lost. No wonder Pittsburgh Penguins coach Mike Sullivan described his team’s 5-3 victory over Nashville in Game 1 of the Stanley Cup Final as “bizarre.” And that doesn’t even include the catfish tossed onto the ice by a Predators fan at PPG Paints Arena in the middle of a second period. The fish that splatted on the Nashville blue line earned the thrower three misdemeanor charges and also came as close to Predators goaltender Pekka Rinne as anything the Penguins managed during 20 minutes in which the highest-scoring team in the league couldn’t even muster a single shot. “It’s not always pretty,” Sullivan said Tuesday. “We don’t get points for style. But what I love about our team is that we find ways to win, we compete.” True, though for the majority of Game 1, the competition was pretty one-sided. The Predators controlled the pace and the puck, just not the scoreboard. It left the guys from “Smashville” in a new position for the first time since they began their mad dash to the final a month ago: chaser instead of chasee as Game 2 looms on Wednesday night. “Now we face a little adversity,” said defenseman Ryan Ellis, who scored the first Stanley Cup Final goal in team history. “We see what kind of group and character we have to bounce back.” The Predators haven’t dropped consecutive games in the postseason and their four previous losses were pretty easy to explain. What happened on Monday night was not. The only area where Nashville wasn’t markedly better than the defending Stanley Cup champions is the only one that really matters. “Everything was there that we liked but the result,” Ellis said. Ellis described the Predators as more disappointed than mad. You can probably add baffled to the list. Nashville became the first team since the NHL began tracking the stat in 1957 to hold a team without a shot for an entire period during the Stanley Cup Final. The gulf actually stretched 37 minutes in all, which sounds like a perfect way for the opponent to win. Except the streak was bookended by goals. The first, a ricochet off Nashville defenseman Mattias Ekholm, gave the Penguins a 3-0 lead with 17 seconds left in the first period. The second, a sniper shot by Penguins rookie Jake Guentzel exactly 37 minutes later, put Pittsburgh back in front to stay at 4-3. The angst Nashville felt isn’t new to those who face the Penguins. Pittsburgh was outshot throughout the first two rounds of the playoffs. It didn’t stop the Penguins from knocking off Columbus in five games and Washington in seven. There’s a bit of a changeling quality to this group as opposed to the one that beat San Jose in six games to win the Cup last spring. Sullivan calls it the ability to “win games different ways,” but what happened in Game 1 seems borderline impossible. The Penguins understand they were equal parts lucky and good. They also understand they can’t afford to have their offense go dormant for nearly two periods. Only a handful of Penguins participated in a skate on Tuesday, though the video room was crowded while they searched for ways to make sure a funk like that doesn’t happen again. “We know that’s not necessarily the way you want to play the game every night,” Crosby said. The Predators are more focused on the process than the end product. Save for a bumpy stretch near the end of the first period where the Penguins scored three times, Nashville did exactly what it wanted to do. Defenseman P.K. Subban pointed to the response after falling behind by three as proof the stage is not too big. “It’s easy in a Stanley Cup game to come back in the room, everybody is quiet, nerves,” Subban said. “But that’s not our hockey club. We know how good we can be. The way we responded was typical Nashville Predators.” Typical for everyone except Rinne. The 34-year-old goalie is the main reason Nashville’s season will extend into June for the first time. Yet his iffy play in Game 1 continued a troubling trend. He came into the series 1-5-2 with a .880 save percentage and 3.57 goals-against average in his career against the Penguins, numbers that ticked in the wrong direction even though he spent a majority of three periods standing in his crease with nothing to do while his teammates were at work at the other end of the ice. Related ArticlesMay 29, 2017 Jake Guentzel’s goal lifts Penguins over Predators in Game 1 of Stanley Cup Final May 29, 2017 NHL’s international plan includes China but not Olympics May 29, 2017 Cody McLeod got his wish fro [...]
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NHL’s international plan includes China but not Olympics
PITTSBURGH — The NHL is heading to Asia next season. Just not the Olympics. Commissioner Gary Bettman emphatically reasserted the league will not take a break next February to participate in the 2018 Winter Games in South Korea next February. The league previously announced it would skip going to Pyeongchang earlier this spring, a point Bettman bluntly reiterated on Monday just hours before Pittsburgh and Nashville met in Game 1 of the Stanley Cup Final. “(We’ve seen) a number of comments from the (International Ice Hockey Federation) and player reps suggesting it was still an open issue, it is not and has not been,” Bettman said. IIHF President Rene Fasel said the governing body was touching base with the NHL Players’ Association two or three times per week, hoping to work out a solution. Lee Hee-beom, head of the Pyeongchang Organizing committee, said in London earlier this month he was “ready to cooperate” with the NHL to make sure the best players in the world could participate in the games as they’ve done in every Winter Olympics since 1998. Nope. While saying the NHL is not “anti-Olympics,” Bettman said league owners are no longer interested in having their arenas go dark in the middle of winter while some of their best employees traveled to the other side of the world, particularly if the International Olympic Committee wants no part of picking up the insurance cost. Bettman said the league “never negotiated” with the IOC, saying the league didn’t have “the appetite to continue participation.” Some players, like Washington star Alexander Ovechkin, have indicated they will play for their home countries regardless of whether the league takes a break or not. Bettman doesn’t see that happening. “We have an expectation that none of our players are going,” he said. “But I don’t want to get into the gymnastics involved in what that means. There’s no reason to pick that fight right now.” The league is hardly abandoning efforts to expand its global footprint. The league will host events on three continents during the 2017-18 season. The Vancouver Canucks and Los Angeles Kings will play a pair of exhibition games in China in September. Ottawa and Colorado will meet in a regular season game in Stockholm in November and Tampa will host to the All-Star game for the second time next January. The Canucks and Kings will play in Shanghai on Sept. 21 and in Beijing on Sept. 23. Beijing will welcome the world for the 2022 Winter Olympics, yet Bettman said the topic of NHL players tagging along never came up. “I think the focus is more about long-term developing the sport, not what happens for two weeks in 2022,” Bettman said. Other takeaways from Bettman’s annual state-of-the-league address: VEGAS BABY The expansion Las Vegas Knights will have 72 hours — and not the initially announced 48 — to review each team’s protected list. Deputy Commissioner Bill Daly said the league is “very pleased” with the city’s response to the arrival of its first major professional sports franchise. UNDER REVIEW There are no plans to expand what is covered by the newly introduced coach’s challenge but Bettman said the league is thinking about using a clock to limit the window on when coaches can alert officials they want a play reviewed. RAISING ARIZONA Related ArticlesMay 29, 2017 Jake Guentzel’s goal lifts Penguins over Predators in Game 1 of Stanley Cup Final May 29, 2017 Cody McLeod got his wish from Avalanche, will play for the Stanley Cup with Predators May 28, 2017 Mystique vs. mayhem in unlikely Stanley Cup Final May 27, 2017 Minus Kris Letang, anonymous Pittsburgh Penguins’ defense still thriving May 27, 2017 Frei: Like sands through the hourglass, these are the days of the Avalanche offseason The league continued to back the Arizona Coyotes‘ ownership in its quest to find a permanent home. The team is entering the final year of its lease with Gila River Arena in Glendale, a significant haul for fans from Phoenix. “We have a lot of patience for the Coyotes,” Daly said. “We’re confident there are a lot of good arena opportunities available to them there. Our ownership is focused on cultivating one of those opportunities. There’s every sense that they’ll be successful in doing that. So we support their efforts.” CATCH ME OUTSIDE The NHL will play at three outdoor games during the 2017-18 season. Ottawa will face Montreal in the NHL 100 Classic at Landsdowne Park in Ottawa on Dec. 16 to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the first NHL game played on Dec. 19, 1917. The Buffalo Sabres and New York Rangers will play at Citi Field — the home of baseball’s [...]
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Jake Guentzel’s goal lifts Penguins over Predators in Game 1 of Stanley Cup Final
PITTSBURGH — The Pittsburgh Penguins rarely tested the hottest goaltender in the playoffs in Game 1 of the Stanley Cup Final against Nashville. They beat Pekka Rinne anyway. Rookie Jake Guentzel fired the puck past Rinne with 3:17 left in regulation to put the Penguins ahead to stay in a back-and-forth 5-3 victory on Monday night. Guentzel snapped an eight-game goalless drought to help the defending champions escape after blowing a three-goal lead. Related ArticlesMay 12, 2017 Predators’ postseason run has turned Music City into Smashville May 7, 2017 Leon Draisaitl’s hat trick helps Oilers rout Ducks 7-1 to force Game 7 Nick Bonino scored twice for the Penguins. Conor Sheary scored his first of the playoffs and Evgeni Malkin scored his eighth. The Penguins won despite putting just 12 shots on goal. Matt Murray finished with 23 saves for the Penguins, who used the first coach’s challenge in Final history to wipe out an early Nashville goal and held on despite going an astonishing 37 minutes at one point without a shot. “I think at the end of the day we’re up 1-0,” Bonino said. “We had a good first, we had a terrible second and we were terrible in the third. I don’t think it’s Xs and Os. We’ve got to work harder, compete a little harder, but we got some timely goals.” Game 2 is Wednesday night in Pittsburgh. Ryan Ellis, Colton Sissons and Frederick Gaudreau scored for the Predators. Rinne stopped just seven shots. The Penguins had all of three days to get ready for the final following a draining slog through the Eastern Conference that included a pair of Game 7 victories, the second a double-overtime thriller against Ottawa last Thursday. Pittsburgh downplayed the notion it was fatigued, figuring adrenaline and a shot at making history would make up for any lack of jump while playing their 108th game in the last calendar year. Maybe, but the Penguins looked a step behind at the outset. The Predators, who crashed the NHL’s biggest stage for the first time behind Rinne and a group of talented defenseman, were hardly intimidated by the stakes, the crowd or the defending champions, trying to become the first repeat winner since Detroit in 1998. All the guys from “Smashville” have to show for it is their first deficit of the playoffs on a night a fan threw a catfish onto the ice to try and give the Predators a taste of home. The Penguins, who led the league in scoring, stressed before Game 1 that the best way to keep the Predators at bay was by taking the puck and spending copious amounts of time around Rinne. It didn’t happen, mostly because Nashville’s forecheck pinned the Penguins in their own end. Clearing attempts were knocked down or outright swiped, tilting the ice heavily in front of Murray. Yet Pittsburgh managed to build a quick 3-0 lead anyway thanks to a fortunate bounce and some quick thinking by Penguins video coordinator Andy Saucier. Part of his job title is to alert coach Mike Sullivan when to challenge a call. The moment came 12:47 into the first when P.K. Subban sent a slap shot by Murray that appeared to give the Predators the lead. Sullivan used his coach’s challenge, arguing Nashville forward Filip Forsberg was offside. A lengthy review indicated Forsberg’s right skate was in the air as he brought the puck into a zone, a no-no. “The impact of that moment and then the chain of events that happened after that with the penalty kills I think changed the course of the game,” Nashville coach Peter Laviolette said. The decision gave the Penguins all the wiggle room they needed to take charge. Malkin scored on a 5-on-3 15:32 into the first, Sheary made it 2-0 just 65 seconds later and when Bonino’s innocent centering pass smacked off Nashville defenseman Mattias Ekholm’s left knee and by Rinne just 17 seconds before the end of the period, Pittsburgh was in full command. Gregory Shamus, Getty ImagesPekka Rinne, right, of the Nashville Predators and Jake Guentzel of the Pittsburgh Penguins watch as a shot by Evgeni Malkin goes into the net for a goal during the first period in Game One of the 2017 NHL Stanley Cup Final at PPG Paints Arena on May 29, 2017 in Pittsburgh. It looked like a repeat of Game 5 of the Eastern Conference finals against Ottawa, when the Penguins poured in four goals in the first period of a 7-0 rout. Nashville, unlike the Senators, didn’t bail. Instead, they rallied and took over the game. Ellis scored the first goal by a Predator in a Stanley Cup Final 8:21 into the second and Nashville kept Rinne downright bored at the other end. Pittsburgh didn’t manage a shot on net in the second period, the first time it’s happened in a playoff game in franchise history — and the first such period by any team in a Final game since the NHL began tracking shots on goal in 1958. Nashv [...]
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Mystique vs. mayhem in unlikely Stanley Cup Final
PITTSBURGH — The dynasty that once appeared so certain is again in the offing for the Pittsburgh Penguins. Four victories against the Nashville Predators in the Stanley Cup Final would make Pittsburgh the first franchise to win back-to-back championships in nearly 20 years and the first in the parity-driven salary cap era. It would give stars Sidney Crosby and Evgeni Malkin their third Cup, one more than their boss — owner Mario Lemieux — earned during his Hall of Fame career and check off whatever boxes remain unchecked for a duo that is becoming one of the most accomplished in NHL history. Yet for all the resiliency the Penguins have shown during their injury-marred title defense, they are taking nothing for granted heading into Game 1 on Monday night. Take Our Poll (function(d,c,j){if(!d.getElementById(j)){var pd=d.createElement(c),s;pd.id=j;pd.src='http://www.denverpost.com/wp-content/plugins/polldaddy/js/polldaddy-shortcode.js';s=d.getElementsByTagName(c)[0];s.parentNode.insertBefore(pd,s);} else if(typeof jQuery !=='undefined')jQuery(d.body).trigger('pd-script-load');}(document,'script','pd-polldaddy-loader')); Not their home-ice advantage. Not their massive edge in Stanley Cup Final experience (156 games vs. just five for the Predators, all by captain Mike Fisher while playing for Ottawa a decade ago). Not their ability under coach Mike Sullivan to thrive under the pressure that once seemed to crush them. “I think the fact that a lot of guys went through it last year and they can draw from that experience is good,” Crosby said. “But it doesn’t guarantee anything.” Certainly not against the swaggering and well-rested Predators. One of the last teams to qualify for the playoffs is now the last one standing between the Penguins and another parade in downtown Pittsburgh. Just don’t call Nashville the underdog. The Predators have hardly played like one while beating Chicago in a lopsided four-game sweep then outrunning St. Louis and outlasting Anaheim to reach the Cup final for the first time. “I know we were the eighth seed but we didn’t feel like a group that we were,” Fisher said. Now the guys from the place that calls itself “Smashville” have a chance to become the first franchise to win the Cup in its first try since Carolina did 11 years ago. That team, like this one, is based in a place hardly considered hockey hotbed a generation ago. This team, like that one, was led by coach Peter Laviolette. This team, like that one, has nothing to lose. “This year we were kind of mediocre in the standings and maybe that’s what we needed just to come into the playoffs not really caring about home ice or who we were playing but just knowing comfortably and confidently as a team we could be in this position,” said Predators defenseman P.K. Subban. A position the Penguins have become increasingly comfortable in under Sullivan. The core that Crosby and Malkin led to the Cup in 2009 went through seven frustrating and fruitless springs before returning to the top in 2016. Now they’re here again, aware of the stakes but hardly caught up in the hype. “I think that it’s a tough road no matter how you get here,” Crosby said. “We found ways all season long and in the playoffs we’ve found ways. We’ve had that same mentality and that’s helped us. I think that’s kind of been our biggest strength.” Some things to look for in would could be a highly entertaining final: HOMECOMINGS (KIND OF) One of Pittsburgh general manager Jim Rutherford’s first moves when he took over in 2014 was to send forward James Neal to Nashville for forward Patric Hornqvist. It’s worked out beautifully for both sides. Hornqvist, who will be a game-time decision for Game 1 while recovering from upper-body injury, gives the Penguins a nearly intractable net-front presence. Neal possesses the kind of shot that can change the complexion of things dramatically. MISSING PARTS Both sides have been forced to navigate their way through serious health issues . The Penguins are playing without star defenseman Kris Letang, out for the season after neck surgery. The Predators lost center Ryan Johansen to a severe thigh injury. Pittsburgh’s defense has thrived even without Letang. Nashville’s lengthy layoff since the conference final mean Fisher and forward Craig Smith should be available for Game 1. MADE IN THE USA This is the first time in the history of the Cup final the coaches on both benches are American. Both Laviolette and Sullivan have stressed the series is about the players, but there’s no denying the ability of both men to cut through the noise. Laviolette has given the Predators the edge they’ve always needed while Sullivan’s straightforward approach and expert button-pushing have made Pittsburgh seemingly immune to any kind of Cup hangover. Rela [...]
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Cody McLeod got his wish from Avalanche, will play for the Stanley Cup with Predators
On Jan. 1, Cody McLeod was a disgruntled member of the Avalanche, the NHL’s worst team which stood 12-23-1 and going nowhere. The Avs had stripped him from the  ‘A’ on his chest as alternate captain, scratched him on opening night and generally only played him when others were injured. McLeod hinted about a trade to a playoff-contending team, and less than two weeks later, the fourth-line forward and middleweight enforcer got his wish. McLeod, Colorado’s most veteran player, was traded to the Nashville Predators on Jan. 13 for minor-league forward Felix Girard. The following night against the Avs at the Pepsi Center, McLeod, in his Nashville debut, scored a goal and fought Jarome Iginla in the Preds’ 3-2 triumph. McLeod enjoys Tennessee. On Monday, he will begin playing for the Stanley Cup when the Preds visit the Pittsburgh Penguins for Game 1 of the best-of-seven Stanley Cup Final. Things unfolded just how McLeod dreamed on Jan. 1, when he spoke candidly with The Denver Post about his situation and his desire to play for a winner. Related ArticlesMay 28, 2017 Mystique vs. mayhem in unlikely Stanley Cup Final May 27, 2017 Minus Kris Letang, anonymous Pittsburgh Penguins’ defense still thriving May 26, 2017 NHL royalty vs. the rowdy neighbors in Stanley Cup Final May 19, 2017 Frei: 2000-01 Avalanche deservedly makes the cut to the “Top 20 Greatest NHL Teams” May 19, 2017 NHL nearing record for one-goal games this postseason “We’ll see when that time comes,” McLeod said of the March 1 trade deadline. “But I love Denver and my family is here. We love the fans and we’ll probably stay here when I retire. But at the end of the day, I want to win. I want a chance to win the Stanley Cup.” He added: “I feel like I come to play hard every night. I know I’m not the most talented guy, and I’m getting older. But I still feel like I have more to give.” McLeod has played in 12 of Nashville’s 16 playoff games. He was scratched in the track meet that was the Preds’ four-game first-round sweep of the Chicago Blackhawks, but has played in each of the last 12. He has a goal and a team-high 23 penalty minutes in those 12 games, and is beloved by his teammates as he was in Colorado. He’s considered a valuable commodity by Preds coach Peter Laviolette. “Cody has so much value to our team,” Laviolette told The Tennessean. “”What he brings in his physicality and his willingness to help any one of his teammates at any point, his energy that he brings in the room, those things — there are no measures unless you’re on the inside and dealing with him on a daily basis like we are.” First-year Avalanche coach Jared Bednar didn’t see that with McLeod, who was deemed an integral part of the team under the club’s two previous head coaches since 2012, when Joe Sacco gave him an “A” on his chest. Sacco’s successor, Patrick Roy, also was a staunch supporter and maintained his leadership role. McLeod was not available for a phone interview. On Jan. 1, he told The Post: “We’re professionals and it’s a privilege to play in the NHL. But I feel like I can still play and contribute more than what I’m getting right now. It’s more frustrating that we’re losing, and the way we’re losing hockey games. I wish I was more part of it.” McLeod still is part of the Avs’ payroll. As part of the trade, Colorado agreed to retain approximately one-third is his $1.333,333 million salary through 2017-18, and the Avs will pay him $533,333 next season. [...]
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Frei: Like sands through the hourglass, these are the days of the Avalanche offseason
In the wake of the Tuesday announcement that assistant coaches Tim Army, Dave Farrish and Francois Allaire won’t return, the Avalanche will have a new-look staff next season. Meanwhile, massaging Joe Sakic‘s job title and bringing in a new general manager, or otherwise significantly rearranging responsibility in the front office, now is unlikely. That tweaking was a possibility Avalanche president Josh Kroenke’s remarks to me hinted at in early May, even as he expressed support for Sakic, and I mentioned Maple Leafs assistant GM Kyle Dubas in the follow column. Related ArticlesMay 26, 2017 Lakewood’s Nicole Hensley could be a golden girl as Team USA’s goalie May 25, 2017 Luke Salazar is back skating in his home state, seeking ECHL title with Colorado Eagles May 24, 2017 Avalanche prospects helped Colorado Eagles reach the upcoming ECHL Finals May 24, 2017 Former Avalanche assistant Tim Army not surprised he was let go May 23, 2017 Avalanche assistants Tim Army, Dave Farrish and Francois Allaire won’t be back Next, Sportsnet’s Toronto-based Elliotte Friedman reported the other day that the Avs indeed had received permission to speak with Dubas. By then, though, Dubas was locked in to staying with the Leafs. What all of this does is lay the groundwork for promoting Sakic (though many seem to be forgetting that Kroenke holds the title of team president) and bringing in a new GM — regardless of how the titles are massaged — if this franchise continues to have problems, and especially if it’s no longer reasonable to argue that the jury still is out on the tie-up-the-core-and-fill-in-around-it strategy. Then it becomes an exit strategy, if Sakic would even want to stay under those circumstances. The coaching staff changes weren’t shocking, and in his Wednesday night conversation with me from his offseason home in Maine, Army acknowledged that, plus that it’s the peril of the business. Scapegoating assistant coaches in any sport is distasteful. It also is increasingly fashionable, especially in pro and college football, where head coaches often save their, um, jobs by showing a GM or athletic director they’re doing something — and, at least implicitly, finding someone to blame for a season gone wrong. Or when management imposes its will on a head coach, saying if he wants to stay, he has to accept an assistant or two or three being shown the door. That doesn’t mean assistant coaches should be invulnerable to accountability and criticism, but the truth is, it more often has become a dishonorable way to shift the focus. In the NHL, after Chicago inexplicably was swept by Nashville in the first round, the Blackhawks announced the firing of long-time assistant Mike Kitchen, Joel Quenneville’s former teammate at Colorado and New Jersey. It was not Quenneville’s choice and he was not happy. The perception was that somebody had to take the fall for the first-round exit, and that someone was Kitchen, in charge of the defensemen and the penalty kill. Here, the changes were due to a combination of embarrassment over the horrible season, plus the realization that Jared Bednar should have the right to do more than inherit coaches in his first crack at the NHL. That wasn’t necessarily inevitable; if the Avalanche had put together a decent or better season, perhaps the comfort level would have been high enough to have all decide to maintain the status quo — including with Nolan Pratt, the former Avalanche defenseman who worked with Bednar in the AHL and joined the Avalanche staff last summer before Roy resigned. While the thought is that it might serve Bednar well to have a veteran as an associate coach — a la Marc Crawford in Ottawa this season — Farrish could have fit that role. Army’s extensive remarks to me managed to both take the high road, with sincerity, and illuminate. His comments about noticing friction between Sakic and Roy after last season were interesting, and as the assistant closest to Matt Duchene, his assessment of Duchene’s tendency to get down on himself — while nothing we didn’t know — was especially significant. [...]
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Minus Kris Letang, anonymous Pittsburgh Penguins’ defense still thriving
PITTSBURGH — The handful of men who carry out the most thankless of tasks for the Pittsburgh Penguins are a rag-tag group thrown together by circumstance and a touch of foresight by general manager Jim Rutherford. They are largely anonymous and blissfully so, only too happy to work in the considerable shadows created by the stars who play in front of them and their unquestioned leader, the one forced to watch the franchise’s run to a second straight Stanley Cup Final in immaculately tailored suits from the press box while he recovers from neck surgery. When defenseman Kris Letang’s star-crossed season ended for good in early April when he abandoned any hope of a comeback from the injuries that limited him to just 40 games this season, the chances of the Penguins becoming the first team to win back-to-back titles was supposed to vanish along with him. Yet here they are hosting Nashville in Game 1 on Monday night, four wins away from a repeat that seemed improbable seven weeks ago. And they’ve done it with a group of blue liners who lack Letang’s unique talents or the undeniable dynamic charisma of the defensemen like P.K. Subban who have helped power the Predators’ dominant sprint to the final. “That’s fine with us,” said Brian Dumoulin, who leads the Penguins in ice time during the postseason. “They’re great players and stuff like that. No chip on our shoulder. We know who we are as a D core.” They might be one of the few. A quick introduction. There’s well-traveled Ron Hainsey, the 36-year-old who needed to wait a record 907 games before reaching the postseason for the first time in his 14-year career. There’s Trevor Daley and Olli Maatta, the battle-tested veteran and the baby-faced kid from Finland, both of whom spent significant chunks of time on the injured reserve this season only to develop an unquantifiable chemistry during the playoffs. There’s Dumoulin, who has become Pittsburgh’s new iron man with Letang out. There’s Ian Cole, the thoughtful well-bearded conscience who revels in the more physical aspects of his job. There’s 39-year-old Mark Streit, who like Hainsey was brought in as insurance at the trade deadline then spent six weeks as a healthy scratch only to fill in capably when another spate of injuries struck in the Eastern Conference finals against Ottawa. Mostly, however, there’s Justin Schultz. Considered a disappointment during three-plus underwhelming seasons in Edmonton, Schultz has spent 15 months in Pittsburgh remodeling his game. It’s Schultz who has taken over as the quarterback on the Penguins’ potent power play. It’s Schultz who has found a knack for the big moment. He delivered the winning goal in Game 4 of the second round against Washington. He put the Penguins ahead in the third period of Game 7 against Ottawa and ended up with the secondary assist on Chris Kunitz’s knuckler that finally put away the Senators in double overtime. Schultz is reluctant to talk about his transformation or the upper-body injury that sidelined him for four games during the Ottawa series. He returned for the decider to play more than 24 minutes, gritting his teeth all the way through. When asked if the injury limited his ability to get off the shot that became his third goal of the postseason, Schultz responded with typical modesty. “Not full but like I said, those guys did such a good job screening … it didn’t have to be the hardest shot to get through,” said Schultz, who set a career -high with 51 points during the regular season and has added another 10 in the playoffs. Schultz, however, could always shoot. That’s never been the problem. It’s at the other end of the ice where he’s truly matured and likely made him one of the most coveted free agents to be in the process. The defenseman who never had any trouble jumping into the play has not become adept at thwarting them too. “He’s always had ability to excel on the offensive side,” said Penguins assistant Jacques Martin, who coaches the defense. “He’s got tremendous vision. He’s been able to replace Kris on the power play. The area (of growth) that’s most noticeable has been his defensive side … his positioning. He’s improved his compete level, his use of his stick, his position. All areas he’s grown in over the season.” The Penguins have needed every last ounce of it as they have from the rest of their defensemen who has spent the last four months trying to replace the seemingly irreplaceable Letang. Related ArticlesMay 26, 2017 NHL royalty vs. the rowdy neighbors in Stanley Cup Final May 25, 2017 Penguins beat Senators in double OT thriller, advance to Stanley Cup Final May 24, 2017 Game 7 offers chance at history for Penguins and Sena [...]
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