Broncos

PHOTOS: Denver Broncos mini camp, June 13, 2017
The Denver Broncos held a mandatory mini camp on June 13, 2017 at Dove Valley in Englewood, Colorado. [...]
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Broncos’ Great QB Battle of 2017 has attracted plenty of drama. But it hasn’t even started yet.
Perched at the 30-yard line of the Broncos’ practice field for the start of their three-day minicamp Tuesday was a quartet of team decision-makers. Kneeling was general manager John Elway, fresh off a lengthy getaway to South Africa. Standing by his side were Matt Russell, his longtime director of player personnel; Mark Thewes, director of team administration; and A.J. Durso, now director of pro personnel. Every throw, they saw. Every run, they witnessed. Every incompletion, every pass-breakup, every pick — they saw it all, their eyes never straying from the cast of players rotating on and off the field. Drama? Pressure? The Broncos are magnets for both, and for nearly five months now — from the moment new head coach Vance Joseph announced they would hold another open competition for the starting quarterback job — their practice facility has morphed into a theater. Every move by Trevor Siemian, the seventh-round pick and victor of last year’s quarterback competition, and Paxton Lynch, the first-round pick getting another shot at the job, have been unofficially scored and weighted by eager onlookers desperate to determine The Guy. But on the field and in the meeting rooms, The Great Quarterback Battle of 2017 has, so far, followed a much different plot line. In fact, the show hasn’t even started yet. “When we get to the fall, we’ll have a true evaluation,” Joseph said “… I don’t have a timetable on it. It could be the first week of camp or it could be the end of preseason. I’m not sure. When I see a clear separation, I’ll call it off.” The Broncos wrapped up organized team activities (OTAs) last week, when they finished installing the offense designed by coordinator Mike McCoy. The final week of the offseason program is about repetition and fine-tuning — running through the playbook multiple times for comfort, and continuing to clean up mistakes. Mission accomplished on Day 1 of minicamp. Siemian and Lynch shared repetitions with the first-team offense, each getting time against the Broncos’ talkative but productive secondary. In a memorable sequence that perhaps reflected the true value of OTAs and minicamp, Lynch threw a pick-six to cornerback Taurean Nixon, then bounced back the next play to hit receiver Cody Latimer with a deep ball along the sideline for a touchdown. “Football is football,” Lynch said. “There are going to be mistakes. No one is perfect. Bounce back from your mistakes and you’ve got a chance to make a big play. Coach McCoy turned to me and just said, “Next play, next play,’ gave me a shot and then I took advantage of it.” Repetition and fine-tuning. “I think we’re all getting there,” Siemian said. “This is more team reps than I’ve gotten in the last two years, and I think that goes for everybody. That repetition is good for us and we’re getting a lot thrown at us. We’ve got every install and we’ve run them three times. That’s good for everybody. Getting there. Not there yet.” But with the learning phase comes uncertainty and, perhaps, a leadership void as the two quarterbacks wait to learn their role and their place in the locker room. While the offense has veterans on the edges in receivers Demaryius Thomas and Emmanuel Sanders, it has lacked a true leader since the retirement of Peyton Manning in March 2016. “I think it’s awkward for guys to be in the competition to be a quarterback and to be a leader,” Joseph said. “If you’re not the guy, it’s not natural to portray that you’re the guy. It’s awkward, but they’ve both been told they have to do it. You have to assume you’ll win the job and lead this football team.” Last summer, when former coach Gary Kubiak led the quarterback competition, an emphasis was placed on the players’ return — how they returned to the field after a lengthy break before training camp and how, if at all, they managed to improve on their own. Related ArticlesJune 13, 2017 Broncos defense dominates offense on Day 1 of minicamp, Garett Bolles’ progress June 13, 2017 PHOTOS: Denver Broncos mini camp, June 13, 2017 June 13, 2017 Broncos have no interest in Eric Decker, Gary Barnidge; guards Ronald Leary, Max Garcia swap spots June 13, 2017 Denver Broncos mandatory mini camp live blog June 12, 2017 Chad Kelly wrist update, rookies spend day volunteering, more Broncos notes This summer, the emphasis remains: The comeback counts in the race to be starter. But the last two months of learning and installation? “Probably zero to none, to be honest,” Joseph said. “It’s going to be won on the football field; it’s going to be won in the ga [...]
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Broncos minicamp Day 1 observations: Defense dominates offense, Garett Bolles’ progress, more
“It’s just like a normal day for us. It’s not a big deal,” Broncos cornerback Chris Harris said with a wide smile. Tuesday wasn’t the first time and it certainly won’t be the last time the defense dominated their offensive counterparts on the field. QBs facing the best There’s never an easy day against the Broncos’ defense for Trevor Siemian or Paxton Lynch. Tuesday was no different as the defense shined with pass breakups and stalling the offense’s inconsistent drives. Siemian began with the first-team offense, but Lynch got several series running the show as well. Here’s one of Lynch’s four-play sequences in the middle of practice: Lynch throws a bad pick-six to cornerback Taurean Nixon on a short pass to the right side. Lynch rebounds with a deep touchdown throw to Cody Latimer down the right sideline. Lynch overthrows his receiver by about five yards out-of-bounds near the left sideline. Lynch hits tight end Austin Traylor for a deep touchdown on a double-move near the right sideline. When both quarterbacks went against the Broncos first-team defense, their performances left much to be desired. Harris on QB battle: “We just try to make it hard for these coaches, make it hard for Paxton and Trevor, don’t give them anything easy, and make them work for their throws. (We want it) to where when they choose who the quarterback is, they’ll know this is the guy who is the most consistent and made the most plays.” Garett Bolles is coming Broncos first-round pick Garett Bolles saw more first-team reps Tuesday than he has all spring. The coaching staff has made Bolles earn his spot in the rotation and he’s finally in the thick of the starter competition as Denver prepares to break for camp. Bolles alternated with Ty Sambrailo at left tackle every other series. He had mixed results with some wins and losses against Shane Ray, Von Miller and the defense. Joseph on Bolles: “He’s made a lot of progress. It’s a tough spot to play as a rookie, and it takes a lot of football IQ to play that spot in the NFL. When he knows what to do, he can block his guy. His talent shows… He’s a first-round pick for a reason.” Defenders standing out Taurean Nixon is an early favorite for the practice squad player to make the 2017 53-man roster. Nixon has looked like a new player this spring by getting his hands on passes with regularity. He had the pick-six in practice Tuesday to go along with another pass breakup. The competition between Nixon, Lorenzo Doss, who also had a pass breakup Tuesday, and Brendan Langley for the final cornerback spots will be intense in training camp. Adam Gotsis continued his impressive spring by breaking up multiple passes at the line of scrimmage. It looks like it’s coming together for the Broncos’ 2016 second-round pick. It may be a bit of a mismatch, but Shane Ray continues to win against Ty Sambrailo when the two are head-to-head. Will Parks may be in line for a much bigger role in 2017. He continues to see significant time with the first-team defense. Corey Nelson also saw a big uptick in first-team reps Tuesday. Related Articles Broncos’ Great QB Battle of 2017 has attracted plenty of drama. But it hasn’t even started yet. PHOTOS: Denver Broncos mini camp, June 13, 2017 Broncos have no interest in Eric Decker, Gary Barnidge; guards Ronald Leary, Max Garcia swap spots Denver Broncos mandatory mini camp live blog Chad Kelly wrist update, rookies spend day volunteering, more Broncos notes Other rookies and dark horses shining De’Angelo Henderson is right behind Isaiah McKenzie for the most impressive rookie in spring workouts so far. Henderson continues to show elusiveness, balance and power as a runner and a receiver out of the backfield. Speaking of McKenzie, Broncos’ head coach Vance Joseph lathered the fifth-round pick with praise once again Tuesday. McKenzie had a solid punt return and juked a few guys out of their shoes as a running back, even while battling sickness. Joseph on McKenzie: “He is explosive. He is fast and he plays fast all the time. He can do a lot of things for us in terms of punt returning, playing some halfback and being the slot guy. He’s a smart guy and he’s very competitive. He’s a guy who should help us in the fall.” Hunter Sharp has also shined as a returner, to a lesser extent. Sharp, a 2016 undrafted free agent out of Utah State, has split punt return reps with McKenzie while being active as a kick returner and receiver. He’s caught Joseph’s eye and could make a strong push for a practice squad spot this summer. Extracurriculars It’s no surprise that defensive end Derek Wolfe was at the center of multiple scuffles T [...]
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Chargers say bittersweet farewells in last week in San Diego
SAN DIEGO — Antonio Gates first arrived at Chargers Park in 2003, and Philip Rivers joined him one year later on the peaceful practice fields and low-slung buildings tucked below a golden hillside on Murphy Canyon Road. The tight end and his quarterback have spent their entire NFL lives inhabiting this training complex in northern San Diego. They’ve honed their skills with uncountable thousands of throws and catches on these fields, and they’ve built warm friendships with hundreds of their fellow Chargers in its locker room. But Chargers Park and San Diego are down to their final week as this team’s home. After a three-day mandatory minicamp concludes Thursday, the players will disperse for summer vacation before the moving vans portentously parked outside the complex are filled for the 85-mile drive north to Costa Mesa, the Orange County city where the Los Angeles Chargers will hold training camp in July. “It’s a bittersweet moment, because obviously the memories are still here,” Gates said Tuesday. “They will forever be here for myself, for the guys that have been around.” Chargers Park will be empty this summer for the first time in two decades, and San Diego will spend its autumn Sundays without the team that arrived from Los Angeles in 1961. The move has loomed for five months, but its imminent finality has some veterans feeling nostalgia during their last few workouts in San Diego’s postcard-perfect sunny weather. “There’s a lot of time spent out there, a lot of balls thrown,” Rivers said while standing in the cool shade just off the practice fields. “A lot of time spent in this locker room, weight room, meeting room. Qualcomm (Stadium) and the memories there from game days are public memories that a lot of people shared in. But shoot, I don’t know how many days — probably almost close to 300-plus a year — we’ve been coming in here in some capacity.” While coach Anthony Lynn and many current Chargers haven’t been around long enough to truly feel their fans’ pain, the senior players and team employees are still processing the end of this era. “You’ve got to look at it as a positive, as we’re going somewhere to a new beginning,” said pass rusher Melvin Ingram, who has spent his entire five-year career with the Chargers. “But you’ve also got to have a bitter feeling, (because) this is where it all started, and you’re leaving the place where it all started.” While the Rams packed up swiftly in St. Louis after securing relocation last year, the Chargers elected to make a slower transition north, holding their offseason workouts and running out their lease at the training complex still owned and maintained by the city of San Diego. Rivers was grateful for the gradual breakup, which allowed him extra time to decide whether to commute to LA or to move his wife and eight children out of their longtime family home. Rivers still hasn’t decided, by the way. “I will figure it out at some point,” he said with a laugh. The Alabama native had never been west of the Mississippi River when the Chargers acquired him in a draft trade. While Rivers still treasures his Southern roots, Southern California has grown on the 35-year-old quarterback and his wife. Related ArticlesJune 13, 2017 Once considered a rival, Danny Woodhead settles in with Ravens June 12, 2017 Eric Decker released, wide receiver is latest in New York Jets’ purge June 9, 2017 Denver inventor’s Cold Roller soothes injuries for NFL’s Broncos, others June 9, 2017 Former NFL player found dead in Indiana river June 8, 2017 Raiders, UNLV still working on deal to use planned stadium “With time, you feel part of the community,” Rivers said. “All but one of my children have been born out here. You begin over time to call it home. I’m very thankful, and always will be.” Gates has long spent parts of his offseason in Los Angeles, so he has given his teammates plenty of tips on the sprawling metropolis. He also needs just one touchdown catch to become the NFL’s career leader in TDs by a tight end, and Gates is at peace with the fact that he’ll set the record and finish his career away from San Diego. He still plans to visit several restaurants and other businesses around town to say a personal goodbye to the city that embraced him after he arrived as an undrafted college basketball player looking for a new life on the West Coast. “It’s just one of those things where we want to take time out to say thank you to San Diego and to the fans that have supported us,” Gates said. “But at the same time, I’m excited to move to LA. I’m excited about the new change, and h [...]
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All about that merchandise, boss: Marshawn Lynch leads NFL jersey sales
When you walk around Denver, every once in a while you’ll still see a No. 19 Jerry Rice jersey from his 2005 training camp with the Denver Broncos. Rice retired after the preseason, making those jerseys a regrettable purchase by September. Presumably the Marshawn Lynch experiment by the Oakland Raiders will go better. [...]
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De'Angelo Henderson meets kid who announced his name during NFL Draft
Henderson thanked T.J. Elliott at the Denver Broncos Boys & Girls Club for bringing him to Denver. [...]
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Eric Decker released, wide receiver is latest in New York Jets’ purge
NEW YORK — Now, it’s official: Eric Decker‘s days with the New York Jets are done. The team released the veteran wide receiver Monday, six days after saying it would do so if it couldn’t work out a trade. While it appeared Decker drew some interest from teams in the trade market, the 30-year-old receiver is now a free agent. It’s the latest in a series of offseason moves by the Jets to cut high-priced veterans. New York cut linebacker David Harris last Tuesday after 10 seasons, and general manager Mike Maccagnan also announced that the Jets would be parting ways with Decker. “We think very highly of Eric, and our focus right now is seeing our young players, how they do,” Maccagnan said that day. “We wish Eric, going forward, a lot of success, but again if we can’t facilitate a trade we will move on from Eric.” Decker’s departure will save the Jets $7.25 million in salary. He receiver had 163 catches for 2,183 yards and 19 touchdowns in three seasons with New York. Decker and Harris have joined Darrelle Revis, Nick Mangold, Nick Folk and Brandon Marshall as veterans who have been released by the team this offseason. “I think there’s a lot of things that go into these decisions,” Maccagnan said. “I think we’ve been focused on trying to create opportunities for a lot of players on this roster. We have some very competitive positions and we’ll see how it unfolds going forward.” Decker was limited to nine receptions for 194 yards and two TDs in three games last year because of a shoulder injury. He had his torn rotator cuff repaired last November, just over a month after having surgery on his hip, which had also been ailing him. Related ArticlesJune 9, 2017 Denver inventor’s Cold Roller soothes injuries for NFL’s Broncos, others June 9, 2017 Former NFL player found dead in Indiana river June 8, 2017 Raiders, UNLV still working on deal to use planned stadium June 8, 2017 NFL backup QB power rankings: Where Broncos’ Paxton Lynch ranks June 7, 2017 Police investigating assault complaint from Colorado man against Rex Ryan His recovery appeared to be going well this offseason as he participated in organized team activities the past few weeks. Decker had said he expected to be ready for the season opener in September. “Thank you @nyjets for the opportunity the last 3 years! I truly made some great memories and friendships that will last forever!” Decker wrote on Twitter on Wednesday. “To all the diehard fans-I wish we would of accomplished more for you but I sincerely appreciate the support through all the ups and downs!” Decker spent his first four NFL seasons in Denver after the Broncos drafted him in the third round in 2010 out of the University of Minnesota. The Jets signed him to a five-year, $36.25 million in March 2014. Decker has 385 receptions for 5,253 yards and 52 touchdowns in seven seasons. [...]
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The Squeeze: Broncos in attendance as the USMNT wins World Cup qualifier
A concentrated look at the recent juice on the Denver Broncos. [...]
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Broncos, Briefly: Sunday, June 11, 2017
A quick look at the recent buzz on the Denver Broncos. [...]
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Respect, loyalty, competition: The complex legacy of Broncos CB Aqib Talib
RICHARDSON, Texas – The humidity is draining on this 80-something degree Texas day even though the sun is hidden. The clouds gain control of the skies and threaten rain which never comes. The hot, worn turf field is starting to hurt some feet. Front and center stands Broncos all-pro cornerback Aqib Talib, full of energy, rocking a gray Yellow Jackets United long-sleeved shirt, representing the youth football organization he helps run and finance. On this recent Sunday, he is “Coach Aqib” to more than 100 grade-school children hanging on every word of his postcamp speech, during which he tells them to chase their dreams and emphasizes the importance of staying out of trouble. It’s odd to hear this message from Talib, who has had his share of off-the-field incidents extending back to his college days at Kansas. But that’s exactly what makes him real to the kids. Talib probably is a little bit of whatever you think he is — rough around the edges, a special talent, authentic, a loose cannon — but here he is the man.  And, at age 31, entering the twilight of his NFL career, the word legacy has been eating at him. He is beginning to wonder how he will be remembered. Katie Wood, The Denver PostAt age 31 Aqib Talib is beginning to wonder how he’ll be remembered. To the members of the youth team he helps run, Talib is the one who made it big out of Texas, an inspiration, a coach and a friend. But known for having a short fuse, Talib has been in and out of the headlines since his college days at Kansas for off-field scrapes. It was just over a year ago — on June 5, 2016 — that Talib accidentally shot himself in the right leg during a wild early morning in Dallas. It was a taste of his old life, but it was a reminder of just how volatile his career has been, and how his legacy might be tarnished by bad decisions. “To judge somebody, you go off what you hear or what you know. We grew up rough. We made a bunch of mistakes. We still do. But we’re real people,” said Aqib’s brother, Ya’qub “Q” Talib. “When you get the full picture, you’ll see what the real Aqib Talib is.” Respect and loyalty are so ingrained in the Broncos star that he jokingly says those words may be his next tattoo. His competitiveness, which shows its horns on and off the field, led his former defensive coordinator, Wade Phillips, to compare his game to Hall of Famer Bruce Smith. Talib admits to fantasizing about wearing his own Hall of Fame gold jacket someday. To his youth team, Talib is the one who made it big out of Richardson, a beacon of hope, a teacher, a coach, a big brother and a friend. To fans of teams he has played for, Talib is a game-changing playmaker with a propensity for pick-six touchdowns and having an unpredictable, short fuse. To his local community back here in Texas, Talib gives back more than he takes and has enough street cred to run every block. That’s an image that may have tempted Talib years ago. Not anymore, he said. “It’s a lot of sides to everybody,” Talib said “You can read about what you want to read about.” While Talib teaches one young camper a proper backpedal, another slender kid tells his friend that he will be the next Talib. The idea of Talib as a role model may seem perplexing, but it’s natural for kids who don’t grow up in a peaches-and-cream world. Talib knows all about that. Respect is vital Why did you snatch that man’s chain, Aqib? It’s his Yellow Jackets players, not reporters, who are asking. Talib’s unfiltered personality came through on New Year’s Day when he snatched a chain off the neck of Oakland Raiders wide receiver Michael Crabtree like Deebo from the movie “Friday.” Talib did it for a reason — a belief that Crabtree was being disrespectful by wearing a flossy chain while playing a gritty sport. But he doesn’t want a group of 11-year-old chain snatchers running around. “It’s entertainment. You don’t snatch a chain. I get paid millions of dollars to be an entertainer, to a certain extent, and play football,” YU vice president Shunte Nettles recalled Talib telling the kids.  “Your job is to be a youth football player, so you can get a shot at a collegiate scholarship and NFL career. Until you get to an NFL career, you need to be in your books and on the straight and narrow. Don’t try to be like Aqib. There’s only one Aqib.” Most of the kids, though, want to be like Aqib. Katie Wood, The Denver PostDenver Broncos cornerback Aqib Talib helps run a football camp for kids at his former high school in Richardson, Texas on May 21, 2017. Respect isn’t bought; you have to earn it, Talib declares. Respect is high on his list of core values. He has it in his city, family and among his NFL peers. And he will fight to pro [...]
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Sacco Sez: Summertime excitement at Broncos headquarters
There is a palpable buzz around the Broncos facility these days. [...]
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How to get kids to read: Enlist the Broncos for summer reading program
Aurora Public LibraryThe “Broncos Playbook.” This offseason, the Denver Broncos have a new game plan: encouraging kids to read. Earlier this month, the franchise launched its inaugural summer reading program, the Broncos Bookworms, which aims to promote literacy among elementary-aged readers. The program began on June 1 and runs through August 15. Young readers can win prizes by finishing five books and submitting their reading logs to Broncos headquarters electronically or by mail. The Broncos have partnered with libraries in the Denver metro area to distribute “Broncos Playbooks,” activities booklets where kids can work on literacy games and log completed books. Participating libraries include Anythink Libraries in Adams County and Aurora Public Libraries. “Bookworms has just ballooned on social media,” said Megan Ellis, a program and outreach librarian at Aurora Public Libraries. “It’s been incredibly popular so far.” Ellis says that the library has received requests for the Playbooks to be mailed all over the region. Reading logs can also be downloaded online. Broncos fans from across the country can participate. “We expect to have participation by kids from all over the country as our fan base extends across the U.S.,” said Ted Santiago, director of marketing for the Broncos. He added that in the future the Broncos hope to expand the program   to more libraries across metro Denver. The positive reception has heartened champions of childhood literacy. “The kids have been excited, and parents have been excited, too,” said Alice Meacham, a children’s guide at Anythink Wright Farms. Anythink has promoted Bookworms by word of mouth alongside its usual summer reading program, mySummer, which encourages readers of all ages to set personal reading goals through June and July. When a child signs up for mySummer, the attendant librarian also mentions Bookworms. In its first weekend, the Wright Farms branch alone had over 1,000 sign-ups. Prizes for successful Bookworms include a certificate of achievement signed by Miles the Mascot, a Broncos Bookworms Bookmark, an invitation to an exclusive on-field reception at Sports Authority Field at Mile High, and other Broncos prizes that are yet to be announced. The Bookworms Program aims to curb the “summer slide,” a phenomenon in which students lose gains in literacy during the summer months. Research suggests that summer regression disproportionately impacts poorer families, who cannot afford programming or summer camps attended by more affluent children. According to the National Summer Learning Association, summer learning loss can leave low-income fifth-graders up to three years behind their peers. “We want to use the influence of the Broncos brand to encourage children to focus on their literary skills and enhance their reading comprehension to keep their skills sharp for the next school year,” said Santiago. “If we make reading fun and enjoyable, it is something that kids will seek out to do.” Related ArticlesJune 7, 2017 Book returned to Connecticut library 52 years overdue May 18, 2017 Belmar Library bookstore a well-kept secret May 16, 2017 Mesa County school district pulls suicide book “Thirteen Reasons Why” Though the Denver program targets elementary-aged children, young readers of any age can participate. The Broncos will also host a number of “Storytime with Miles” events throughout the summer at participating Aurora Public Libraries, where children can meet and read with Miles the Mascot and Broncos cheerleaders, starting June 14. (For the schedule, click here.) Kids can also earn additional prizes by participating in the Scholastic Summer Reading Program, which offers rewards based on the number of hours spent reading. Completed reading logs must be received by Aug. 21 in order to qualify as a Broncos Bookworm. Playbooks can be mailed to Denver Broncos Football Club; Attn: Broncos Bookworms; 1701 Bryant St., Suite 900; Denver, 80204; or can be scanned and emailed to BroncosBookworms@Broncos.nfl.net. [...]
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Tyler Polumbus, Rick Lewis to join KOA’s Broncos game-day broadcasts
Less than two years after retiring from the NFL, Denver native and former Broncos tackle Tyler Polumbus will be returning to Mile High on game days this season. Polumbus is leaving 104.3 The Fan to join iHeartRadio and serve primarily as 850 KOA’s sideline reporter during game broadcasts. In the near future, he will host a daily show on an iHeart station. “I’m very excited to be joining the iHeartRadio family as a member of the Denver Broncos broadcast team with Dave Logan and Rick Lewis,” Polumbus tweeted Friday. “Leaving The Fan comes with mixed emotions as I am incredibly grateful for the start they gave me in radio. Thank you to Bob Call and Armen Williams for the opportunity at The Fan and to the rest of the amazing staff at The Fan.” KOA enters its 48th season as the flagship station for Broncos game broadcasts. The addition of Polumbus is part of a broader shakeup for the network on game days that started with the departure of Ed McCaffrey in late April. While Polumbus takes over for Andy Lindahl on the sidelines, Rick Lewis takes McCaffrey’s role alongside play-by-play announcer, Dave Logan, in the booth. Logan, a former CU and Broncos receiver, has a been a staple on game broadcasts for nearly 30 years and is a host with Lewis and Kathy Lee on “Lewis & Logan,” a show that debuted in January on 94.1 KOA. “I’m honored to be named the new color commentator for the Broncos with Dave Logan,” Lewis wrote. “This is a dream job for me!” The gig for Polumbus, however, is the latest in his swift rise in local media following a playing career that started and ended in Colorado. A standout at Cherry Creek High, Polumbus went on to earn All-Big 12 second-team honors during his four-year career at the University of Colorado (2003-07), then signed with the Broncos as an undrafted free agent in 2008. He played eight years in the league with four different teams and earned a Super Bowl 50 ring with Denver before calling it quits in April 2016. But life as a true retiree was short lived, as Polumbus became a sought-after guest for Broncos coverage on local networks and then a regular contributor to 104.3. In February, the network announced it had signed Polumbus to be co-host of a show with Broncos insider Cecil Lammey from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. on weekdays. With his roots still firmly planted in Colorado and work still immersed in football, Polumbus will again be a regular sight — and sound — on Broncos game days. “Onward and forward we go,” he wrote. “Fired up to be back in the action and traveling with the Broncos team.” [...]
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